December 03, 2005

My dream election outcome

This is more of a frivolous post expressing my dream outcome of the election; NDP Majority!!!

But I should be somewhat realistic I guess. Personally I would like to see only a minority government. At this point I think that a Conservative minority would be optimal with the NDP holding the balance.

In my own personal opinion it would serve several big purposes if this were the case. First, it would probably mean the end of Paul Martin's reign as Liberal leader. I won't deny that this is a scenario I have wanted to see since before it began. I was a member of the Liberals when it all took place and I was open about my opinion then.

Martin didn't have a real vision for the party, all he had was a tagline. All he and his followers ever said was 'Renewal'. He used this word to refer to party support, the party platform, the party itself, etc. However, it meant nothing. The party platform was only slightly better then the Conservatives', which is generally non-existent, and it was geared towards getting votes rather then setting out a real vision of change. After Martin took over everyone saw the renewal of the party first hand. He booted out or demoted the majority of people that were not supporters of his leadership. Many people saw candidates parachuted into their ridings over popular and supported candidates. Even general members, like myself, were treated with disdain for not being Martin supporters at social functions. And obviously the renewal of party support didn't happen seeing as Martin hasn't been able to buy votes like he was hoping. A Conservative minority would most likely mean the end of Martin's jaded and cynical run as party leader and hopefully a true visionary and refreshed leader will step in to take the reigns (though that doesn't mean I'd be willing to rejoin).

The second reason I would like to see a Conservative minority with the NDP holding the balance is that it would undermine the Conservatives. It is no secret that the CPC is much more right-wing then the PCs ever were. This is especially true concerning social issues. So how would its base feel if Harper and his goons were having to make compromises with the NDP just to hold onto power? Probably they wouldn't be very happy. The idea of the CPC having internal strife is a welcome one. Furthermore, especially on social issues, some of the former PC members that are still hanging around may actually agree with the NDP and that alone will be enough to widen the divisions of the party.

Thirdly, the minority status will allow Harper to hang around even longer without having any real power to cause damage. Harper will probably at some point expose himself, as will the other members of his party. It is then we will likely see the real extent of how far gone the real CPC is from mainstream Canada. In such an event it may be a long time before the public will truly ever want to see a far-right wing CPC in power. It will also spell the end of Harper who is just as jaded and cynical as Martin is.

Lastly, though this is more a derivative of all the above (and partially wishful thinking), with a Conservative minority and the fallout of such an event, the NDP will get a great deal more exposure. Hopefully, it is all positive. What this means is that it is possible that the NDP will get the publicity needed to be considered a true rival to both the Conservatives and especially the Liberals. That voting for the NDP will seem like a real alternative rather then the so-called indirect Conservative vote. The NDP gained a lot of good opinions when bargaining with the Liberals and the same may happen with them bargaining with the Conservatives. With any luck it will work out to give them more hope and more seats in the future.

And that's it... while this may seem all a bit crazy and far-fetched to some, its still my vision and my prediction!!

2 comments:

ALW said...

Well, I agree that a Tory minority with the NDP holding the balance is the best scenario, but that's about all.

I think you overestimate the "far rightness" of the CPC. This is not the Canadian Alliance. It's not even the Mike Harris PCs. Years of frustrating has really mellowed out the party ranks. Except for the same-sex marriage issue, it's hard to point out what's radical that's left in their platform: no flat tax, no private health care, no huge spending cuts, no anti-Quebec language, no abortion pledges, backing away from American foreign policy. Looks pretty centrist to me.

I also think you're mistaken if you think the CPC's base would be angry with Harper for compromising. On the contrary, a large part of the CPC's base, myself included, don't even want a Tory majority. Why? Because it'd probably be a one term government. But a minority supported by the NDP would give Harper a chance to demonstrate he's not that scary after all. Who would gain more from a Tory-NDP alliance is hard to say, but one thing's certain: the Liberals would lose out, big time.

I think a lot of people have finally reached the point where they realize it's more important to boot the Liberals from office than it is to have a government with a particular orientation to replace them. I certainly feel that way. It's not about policy anymore; it's entirely about integrity. Even I would rather have an NDP majority than see the Liberals back in power. Because with the NDP I just disagree about policy; they aren't criminals. There's a huge difference.

Kyle said...

ALW,

I don't necessarily believe that just because it's not in the party platform it's not the intentions of the party. Almost all parties are guilty of not really following their party platform, especially the platform they put out during election time. If many of the same members of the party are running from the last election, then I wouldn't put much stock into the centrist ideas of the platform.
While a party may change its focus (on paper) it doesn't mean the members have done the same thing. If anything, I would say a shift to the centre is more a political move brought on by the negative public perception of the last election.

As for Harper being scary, I do think the more he's in the spotlight the worse it will be for him. This is a man who, during a photo op, snapped at a kid. He's scary to the public probably for many reasons but his own actions is a big one.

I do agree that people are at fed up with the Liberals, and rightly so. They are a tired group who have lost any real focus and vision and can't see beyond power. It's time to dump them and reinvigorate Canadian's faith in politics with some real leadership (which probably won't come this election and maybe even the next).

Quotes from people smarter than me...

"If a free society cannot help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich" ~ JFK

"Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter. " ~ Martin Luther King Jr.

"Those who would give up essential liberty to purchase a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. " ~ Benjamin Franklin

"First it is necessary to stand on your own two feet. But the minute a man finds himself in that position, the next thing he should do is reach out his arms. " ~ Kristin Hunter

"When you're a mayor and you have a problem you blame the provincial government. If you are provincial government and you have a problem you blame the federal government. We don't blame the Queen any more, so once in a while we might blame the Americans." ~ Jean Chretien

"Which is ideology? Which not? You shall know them by their assertion of truth, their contempt for considered reflection, and their fear of debate." ~ John Ralston Saul

"It is undoubtedly easier to believe in absolutes, follow blindly, mouth received wisdom. But that is self-betrayal." ~ John Ralston Saul

"Everybody dies, Tracey. Someone's carrying a bullet for you right now, doesn't even know it. The trick is to die of old age before it finds you." ~ Cpt. Malcolm Reynolds (Firefly, Episode 12)

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